Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame

20 10 2015

This continues my series on Yankee starting pitchers.

Six pitchers might seem like a lot of Hall of Famers, and it is.

The Yankees have six starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame who pitched primarily for New York. But if great pitching wins championships, a team with 27 champions ought to have more than six pitchers in the Hall of Fame who primarily pitched for that team (keep in mind that Jack Chesbro, one of the six, pitched for the New York Highlanders before any of the Yankee championships).

Though I’m focused on starters here and only counting them, I also should note that the Yankees were the primary team of Hall of Fame reliever Goose Gossage. And Mariano Rivera is a sure first-ballot Hall of Famer, presuming his reputation remains unscathed the next few years.

But the starting pitcher is the most important player in every game and a team can’t win a championship without solid starting pitching. And you can’t win a bunch of championships without a bunch of great starting pitchers.

Let’s see how other teams stack up:

Giants

The New York/San Francisco Giants have won a respectable eight World Series. Three of those are too recent to have any pitchers eligible for Cooperstown, but Tim Lincecum and Madison Bumgarner have strong early careers and are young enough (31 and 26) to have reasonable shots at the Hall of Fame if they continue pitching well.

Even without considering the recent dynasty, the Giants match the Yankees with six Hall of Fame pitchers who played primarily for them: Christy Mathewson, Joe McGinnity, Rube Marquard, Carl Hubbell, Juan Marichal and Gaylord Perry. (Perry won his Cy Young Awards for the Indians and Padres, but he pitched a decade for the Giants and had two 20-win seasons in San Francisco.)

And I’m not counting Amos Rusie, Mickey Welch or Tim Keefe, who pitched primarily for the Giants in the 19th Century, before the start of the World Series.

A’s

The Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland A’s, with nine World Series titles, were the primary team for five Hall of Fame starters: Rube WaddellChief Bender, Eddie Plank, Lefty Grove and Catfish Hunter (as well as relievers Rollie Fingers and Dennis Eckersley).

Dodgers

The Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, with six World Series championships, have five Hall of Fame pitchers who played primarily for the Dodgers: Burleigh Grimes, Dazzy Vance, Don Drysdale, Sandy Koufax and Don Sutton.

Braves

The Boston/Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, with just three World Series titles, one in each of their cities, have five Hall of Fame starters: Warren Spahn, Phil Niekro, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and John Smoltz.

I don’t count Vic Willis because he pitched his best seasons for the Braves before the World Series started or Kid Nichols, who pitched for the Braves only before the World Series.

Indians

My Bob Feller autograph

My Bob Feller autograph

With just two World Series titles, the Indians also had five Hall of Fame pitchers who played primarily for Cleveland: Addie Joss, Stan Coveleski, Bob Feller, Bob Lemon and Early Wynn. And that doesn’t count Gaylord Perry, who played less than four seasons in Cleveland but won his first Cy Young Award there.

Cardinals

Bob Gibson's autograph, with some Cardinal teammates, on a ball belonging to my son Joe.

Bob Gibson’s autograph, with some Cardinal teammates, on a ball belonging to my son Joe.

The St. Louis Cardinals have won 11 World Series (second to the Yankees) and have three Hall of Fame starters who pitched primarily for them: Jesse Haines, Dizzy Dean and Bob Gibson.

Two Hall of Fame pitchers who played most of their seasons for the Phillies, Alexander and Carlton, also had 20-win seasons for the Cardinals (as Hunter did for the Yankees). At least a half-dozen Yankee starters who aren’t in the Hall of Fame have stronger Cooperstown cases than Haines.

Though Hall of Fame reliever Bruce Sutter was primarily a Cub, he saved 127 games for the Cardinals (just six fewer than he saved for Chicago), leading the league twice in St. Louis, including for the 1982 champs.

Phillies

My Steve Carlton autograph

My Steve Carlton autograph

The Phillies, with two World Series titles, were the primary team of three Hall of Fame pitchers: Pete Alexander, Robin Roberts and Steve Carlton. Jim Bunning pitched nine years for the Tigers, but his six years with the Phillies, starting with three straight 19-win seasons, were arguably as good. (In determining the “primary” team for players who played prime years for multiple teams, I chose the team for which the pitcher won the most games. So, though Alexander pitched nine seasons for the Cubs and eight for the Phillies, Philadelphia is his primary team because he won 190 games there, including three straight 30-win seasons.)

Chicago Cubs

The Cubs have two World Series titles and two Hall of Fame pitchers, Mordecai Brown and Ferguson Jenkins. Plus they got some prime seasons from Alexander (nine seasons, 128 wins, including two 20-win seasons) and Maddux (10 seasons, 133 wins, including his first Cy Young Award). Hall of Fame reliever Bruce Sutter also was primarily a Cub.

Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox have won seven World Series. Pedro Martinez is the only pitcher in the Hall of Fame who played primarily for the Red Sox.

But five Hall of Famers pitched several years, including some outstanding prime seasons, for the Red Sox: (Cy Young, eight years, 192 wins; Grove, eight years, 105 wins; Babe Ruth, six years, 89 wins; Eckersley, eight years, 88 wins; Pennock, eight years, 62 wins). Hunter’s the only starting pitcher in the Hall of Fame primarily for another team who pitched well or long for the Yankees.

And the Red Sox tally doesn’t count Roger Clemens, being kept out of the Hall of Fame only because of suspicions about performance-enhancing drugs, and Curt Schilling, who’s certain to make the Hall of Fame.

Other teams’ world championships and primary Hall of Fame starters:

White Sox: Three World Series wins, three Hall of Famers, Ed WalshTed Lyons and Red Faber. And that’s with their Black Sox pitchers being banned from baseball. The White Sox also were the primary team for Hall of Fame reliever Hoyt Wilhelm.

Senators/Twins: Three World Series wins, two Hall of Famers, Walter Johnson and Bert Blyleven.

Tigers: Four World Series wins, two Hall of Fame starters, Hal Newhouser and Jim Bunning.

Browns/Orioles: Three World Series wins, one Hall of Famer, Jim Palmer.

Reds: Five titles, one Hall of Famer, Eppa Rixey.

Pirates: Five titles, one Hall of Famer. Vic Willis pitched his best stretch for the Pirates, including their 1909 World Series winner. He won 20 all four seasons in Pittsburgh, 89 games total. He played eight years and won 151 games for the Braves, but that was before the World Series, so in this context, he counts as a Pirate.

Expansion teams combined: Eight World Series championships, three Hall of Fame starters: Tom Seaver, Randy Johnson, Nolan Ryan.

Doing some math for you, the Cubs, White Sox, Phillies, Braves and Indians all had as many, or more, Hall of Fame starters as they have won championships. The only three original teams with higher ratios of championships to Hall of Fame starting pitchers than the Yankees (Red Sox, Pirates and Reds) have 10 fewer championships combined than the Yankees.

And the Red Sox’ ratio will drop below the Yankees as soon as Schilling or Clemens joins the Hall of Fame.

If you count half a Hall of Fame pitcher for those such as Grove with the Red Sox, Carlton with the Cardinals or Hunter for the Yankees, who had a strong secondary team, the Red Sox’s ratio falls well below the Yankees now. And the Cardinals’ ratio falls further below the Yankees.

The Reds’ and Pirates’ higher ratios just indicate their lack of strong pitching. Who would be their strongest contenders as starting pitchers not in the Hall of Fame yet? Bob Friend for the Pirates and Jim Maloney for the Reds, I’d guess. Maloney has no shot at the Hall of Fame. The Reds’ championships were built mostly on offense, with some good pitchers having their best years. Friend is a long shot of the Hall of Fame, I suppose, but at least three primary Yankees (Ron Guidry, Allie Reynolds and Andy Pettitte) have stronger cases for the Hall of Fame. Three more pitchers who played several years, including 20-win seasons, for the Yankees, but pitched primarily somewhere else, also have stronger Hall of Fame cases than Friend (Tommy John, Mike Mussina and David Cone). And that doesn’t count Clemens.

None of the teams anywhere close to the Yankees in ratio of championships to Hall of Fame starters has anywhere near the number of borderline contenders as the Yankees.

Pitchers in Hall of Fame dynasties

Another way of assessing the relationship between championships and Hall of Fame selections is by seeing how well dynasties have done in producing Hall of Fame pitchers.

Yankee dynasties have been significantly more successful than dynasties of other teams, in terms of winning league championships and winning World Series. I have ranked baseball dynasties here in descending order, based on how many championships they won (with losing World Series appearances as a tie-breaker), noting their Hall of Fame starting pitchers. I do not take note of division champions or wild-card teams, since those weren’t opportunities for teams before 1969.

Yankees, 1947-64

One of my prized autographs

One of my prized autographs

This was by far the greatest dynasty in history. They won 10 World Series in that stretch and won five more American League championships.

Hall of Fame starting pitcher in his prime: Whitey Ford.

Belongs in the Hall of Fame: Allie Reynolds.

Yankees, 1932-41

In 10 years the Yankees won six World Series and didn’t lose any.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers in their prime: Lefty Gomez and Red Ruffing.

Past his prime: Herb Pennock, playing just in 1932.

Yankees, 1996-2003

The Joe Torre Yankees won four World Series and played in two more.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers in their prime: None.

Hall of Fame contenders: Clemens would be an automatic Hall of Famer if not for suspicion that he used performance-enhancing drugs. While his best years were with other teams, he won a Cy Young for the Yankees. Pettitte admitted using PEDs, which hurts his case for the Hall of Fame. Cone and Mussina have strong cases for Hall of Fame election. These players have not been on Hall of Fame ballots as long as players from older dynasties (Pettitte retired in 2013 and is not yet eligible for the writers’ ballot.)

Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, 1955-66

The Dodgers won four World Series and played in two more in this stretch. They rank below the Torre Yankees because they achieved the same numbers of championships over 12 years, compared to eight.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers in their prime: Koufax and Drysdale.

Rookie Hall of Famer: Sutton was a rookie but significant contributor for the 1966 Dodgers.

Boston Red Sox, 1912-18

The Red Sox won four World Series, without losing any, in this stretch.

Hall of Fame starters in their prime: Ruth. Of course, Ruth spent most of his career as the game’s best slugger after he moved to the outfield. But his second famed niche in baseball fame is as the best ever player to excel at pitching and hitting. He pitched four solid years for the Red Sox dynasty, including two 20-win seasons, leading the league in shutouts and ERA in 1916 and complete games in 1917. And he was 3-0 as a World Series pitcher. Babe certainly counts here.

Hall of Fame pitcher before his prime: Pennock was a minor pitcher at the end of this dynasty early in his career. 

Great pitcher not in the Hall of Fame: Smoky Joe Wood had two stellar years and two solid years for the Red Sox dynasty, but injuries curtailed his career and he never got more than 18 percent of the writers’ vote for the Hall of Fame.

Yankees, 1921-8

The Miller Huggins Yankees won three World Series and played in three more in this eight-year stretch.

Hall of Famers in their prime: Pennock and Hoyt.

St. Louis Cardinals, 1926-34

The Cardinals won three World Series and played in two more in this nine-year stretch. The team turned over a lot from 1926 to ’34, but didn’t have a gap of more than two years without a World Series appearance.

Hall of Fame pitchers in their prime: Alexander, Dean.

Philadelphia A’s, 1910-14

These A’s won three World Series in five years and played in a fourth.

Hall of Fame pitchers in their prime: Plank, Bender.

Hall of Fame pitcher before his prime: Pennock was actually part of four dynasties. As a 20-year-old, he was 11-4 for the 1914 A’s, who were swept in the World Series by the Boston Braves. He was a minor contributor to the Red Sox dynasty, pitching just 14 games, and winning none, for the 1915-16 champions. He was 9-5, with two World Series relief appearances, for the 1932 champions that I called the start of a Yankee dynasty that ran through 1941. His major contribution was to the 1921-8 Yankee dynasty, for whom Pennock had two 20-win seasons and won five World Series games.

Oakland A’s, 1972-4

The A’s won three World Series in a row.

Hall of Fame starting pitcher in his prime: Hunter. The A’s also had a Hall of Fame reliever, Fingers.

Hall of Fame contender: Vida Blue appeared on his way to Cooperstown during this dynasty, winning 20 games three times in five years before reaching age 26. But he faded in his early 30s, was at the center of the Kansas City Royals cocaine scandal of the early 1980s, and retired with 209 games. He lasted just four years on the writers’ ballot. He made the 2010 Expansion Era ballot, but is not likely to ever make the Hall of Fame.

Red Sox, 2004-13

The David Ortiz Red Sox won three championships in 10 years, without losing a World Series.

Hall of Fame pitcher in his prime: Martinez pitched for just one of the Red Sox champions, and had his best years before they finally won the World Series. But his 2004 season was 16-9, good for fourth-place in the Cy Young voting, with two post-season wins. He was still in Hall of Fame form.

Hall of Fame contenders. Schilling will make the Hall of Fame someday, probably on the writers’ ballot. Josh Beckett, Derek Lowe and Tim Wakefield are not going to be Hall of Famers. Too early to say for Jon Lester or Clay Buchholz, but both look unlikely at 31.

Cardinals, 1942-46

The Cardinals won three World Series and played in a fourth, mostly during World War II when many baseball stars were serving in the military.

Hall of Fame pitchers in their prime: None.

New York Giants, 1921-4

This team appeared in the World Series four straight years, winning two.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers: No one.

Chicago Cubs, 1906-10

This team, best known for its Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance infield (all in the Hall of Fame), won two World Series and played in two more in five years.

Hall of Fame pitcher in his prime: Brown.

Baltimore Orioles, 1966-71

The Orioles’ dynasty started as soon as Frank Robinson arrived in a trade from the Reds for Milt Pappas. Over the next six seasons, they won two World Series and played in two more.

Hall of Fame starting pitcher in his prime: Palmer.

Hall of Fame contenders: Dave McNally and Mike Cuellar are not likely to make the Hall of Fame.

Yankees, 1976-81

The Yankees matched the Orioles with two World Series wins and two appearances in six years. I ranked the Orioles ahead as a small offset to my admitted and strong Yankee bias.

Hall of Fame pitchers in their prime: None.

Hall of Fame pitcher past his prime: Hunter. Catfish had one prime year for the Yankees in 1975, the year before their first World Series appearance of this dynasty. But he was clearly in decline during their championship years and gone by the 1981 World Series.

Hall of Fame contenders. As I’ve said many times, Guidry and John belong in the Hall of Fame, and both were pitching in their prime for this Yankee dynasty.

Doesn’t count. Hall of Famer Gaylord Perry was 4-4 in 10 games for the 1980 Yankees. But that was not a championship year, and didn’t contribute to his Hall of Fame qualifications.

Cincinnati Reds, 1970-76

Like the Orioles and Yankees of overlapping eras, the Big Red Machine won two World Series and played in two more, but they stretched their championship play out over seven seasons. Here’s how perfectly they overlap with the Oriole and Yankee dynasties: The Reds’ dynasty started with a five-game loss to the Orioles and ended with a sweep of the Yankees. They also overlapped with the A’s dynasty of the ’70s, losing the 1972 World Series to them.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers: None.

Hall of Fame contenders. No dynasty had less remarkable starting pitching. Don Gullett, who moved to the Yankees as a free agent after the 1976 season, might have had a shot if he had stayed healthy and pitched another decade. But the Reds’ greatness was at the plate and in the field: Hall of Famers Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan and Tony Perez, plus Pete Rose, who gambled away his sure shot at the Hall of Fame.

Philadelphia A’s, 1929-31

The A’s played in three straight World Series, winning the first two.

Hall of Fame starting pitcher in his prime: Grove had the best three-year stretch of his career for these A’s.

Hall of Fame starting pitcher past his prime: Hoyt had a solid 10-5 season and got a World Series start for the 1931 A’s, similar to Hunter for the 1970s Yankees, declining but still contributing.

Cardinals, 1964-68

The Cardinals played three great seven-game series in five years, winning two of them.

Hall of Fame starting pitchers in their prime: Gibson was dominant for all three Cardinal teams. Carlton was a significant contributor to the ’67-8 teams, starting 61 games over two years and winning 27, with winning records both years and his first All-Star selection. I count those as the first two years of a very long prime. But his peak years — all six 20-win seasons and all four Cy Young seasons — were yet to come.

Atlanta Braves, 1991-9

The Braves won five National League championships in nine years, but just one World Series, the only “dynasty” I include here that includes only one world championship.

Hall of Fame starters in their primes: Maddux, Glavine and Smoltz.

How do the Yankees stack up?

Certainly it’s rare for a dynasty not to include some starting pitchers in their prime who will make the Hall of Fame. That has happened in only five dynasties: two Yankee dynasties (1976-81 and 1996-2003) and three non-Yankee dynasties: 1920s Giants, 1940s Cardinals and 1970s Reds. World War II certainly explains the Cardinals and the offensive powerhouse explains the Reds.

The Torre Yankees would have Clemens and possibly Pettitte (someday) in the Hall of Fame if not for PEDs (and either or both might get there eventually anyway). And it’s too early to say Mussina won’t make it (Cone’s a longer shot).

The 1970s Yankee dynasty did have a declining Hall of Famer in Hunter and two Yankees who get screwed in Hall of Fame voting, Guidry and John. John will probably make it someday.

On the other end, the disparity between Yankees and other teams is pretty clear and outrageous.

For the greatest dynasty in baseball history, by far, to have only one starting pitcher in the Hall of Fame is entirely puzzling. You can’t attribute this just to the offensive firepower, though. In that same 18-year stretch the Yankees had Yogi Berra‘s career and most of Mickey Mantle‘s, but just the final five years of Joe DiMaggio‘s career and 10 years of Phil Rizzuto. (I’m not counting Johnny Mize or Enos Slaughter, who were past their primes when they contributed to Yankee championships.)

The Dodgers of the same era had as many Hall of Famers in their prime: Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Duke Snider and Pee Wee Reese. The Reds’ offense two decades later, with Bench, Morgan and Perez in the Hall of Fame and Rose barred for his off-field behavior, was at least as mighty.

Allie Reynolds' autograph on a baseball my wife's uncle used to take to Yankee Stadium in the 1950s. Yes, that's Mickey Mantle's autograph to the right. Also outfielder Gene Woodling and pitcher Bob Kuzava.

Allie Reynolds’ autograph on a baseball my wife’s uncle used to take to Yankee Stadium in the 1950s. Yes, that’s Mickey Mantle’s autograph to the right. Also outfielder Gene Woodling and pitcher Bob Kuzava.

How can a dynasty that produced 10 World Series titles send only one starting pitcher to the Hall of Fame? Reynolds absolutely belongs there.

Three Yankee teams were unquestionably the most dominant dynasties ever. Another gives the Yankees four of the top six. And if you broke the Yankees of the 1950s and ’60s into two, they would have five of the top seven. Two of those Yankee dynasties had two Hall of Fame pitchers in their primes. Another had one. The Torre Yankees had Roger Clemens, who’s being excluded from the Hall of Fame for different reasons than Rose, but similarly would be an automatic selection based solely on performance.

Four less successful dynasties (Dodgers, 1910-14 A’s, 1926-34 Cardinals and ’60s Cardinals) had as many Hall of Fame starters in their primes as any Yankee dynasty, and the Braves had more. As soon as Schilling enters the Hall of Fame, the Red Sox will join the ranks of less-successful dynasties with as many Hall of Fame starters as any Yankee dynasty (and more than others).

Those five non-Yankee dynasties had more Hall of Fame starting pitchers in their primes than the greatest, longest-lasting dynasty ever and another six shorter, less successful dynasties matched those dynasties with one starter in his prime. And all 11 of those dynasties had more Hall of Fame starters in their primes than the Yankees of 1976-81 and 1996-2003, which so far have been shut out (except for Hunter’s post-prime turn in the ’70s.

The bottom line

You can argue over whether Reynolds, John, Guidry, Clemens, Pettitte, Cone and Mussina belong in the Hall of Fame. But this much is clear from examining Yankee starting pitchers’ success on the field and in Hall of Fame selections: Championship contributions and post-season play are not significant factors in selection to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

What’s a dynasty?

What counts as a dynasty? For purposes of this post, a team had to meet one of two criteria:

  • Making at least three World Series in 10 years (without a gap of more than three years out of the World Series) and winning at least two.
  • Making at least four World Series in 10 years and winning at least one.

So the 1992-3 Blue Jays and 1987-91 Twins weren’t dynasties because none of them made a third World Series. The 1988-90 A’s made three World Series but won only one. The Cardinals of the 1980s and Giants of the 1930s won a World Series and lost two, so they needed to make another Series or win another to meet the dynasty criteria I set. The Cardinals of 2004-2013 fall short, too, with a four-year absence from the World Series between their 2006 and 2011 championships.

I could have extended the Dodgers’ dynasty of the 1950s and ’60s, or broken it into two, but the four-time National League champions from 1947-53 never won a Series. Even the 1955-66 dynasty, I could have broken into two dynasties, 1950s and ’60s. I kept them together because Drysdale was an All-Star and possibly the Dodgers’ best pitcher in the late 1950s and Koufax was already starting (though not yet dominating).

Dividing the Yankee dynasties was not always easy, because some of them didn’t have significant breaks between them. I regarded a three-year gap between World Series as a gap between dynasties. So the Yankees of the 1920s and ’30s were separate dynasties, though Gehrig was a significant part of both. I didn’t add the 1943 championship team to the ’30s dynasty (but did add ’41) because the 1941 team was just one year removed from the ’39 championship team and had some of the same significant players. The ’43 team was also just one year removed from ’41, but with many players retired or serving in the military during World War II, the teams were substantially different, so I didn’t include 1943 in a dynasty.

The 1947-64 Yankees could have been broken into two dynasties, maybe the Stengel dynasty and the Houk dynasty. However, I regarded it as a single dynasty because it never had a break of more than one year from the World Series. Though the team turned over completely (except Berra) from 1947 to 1964 and had four different managers, Bucky Harris‘ 1947 team included some key players who were part of Stengel’s 1949-53 champions: Berra, DiMaggio, Reynolds, Rizzuto. And the ’50s and ’60s teams shared two core stars: Mantle and Ford, as well as Berra (who had declined to a role player in the ’60s). I regarded it as a single dynasty.

The Yankees of 1976-81 and 1996-2003 were easier to identify. I could have added the 2009 championship to the latter dynasty, especially given the overlap in core players such as Derek Jeter, Mariano Rivera and Jorge Posada. But, with a six-year gap between World Series and a new manager, I decided not to include it.

Also in this series

Other posts in this series on Yankee starting pitchers:

Next: I wrap this series up tomorrow, addressing whether pitching wins championships and why the Yankees have won so many championships.

Source note: Unless otherwise noted, statistics cited here come from Baseball-Reference.com.

Correction invitation: I wrote this series of blog posts over several months, mostly late at night while unable to sleep while undergoing medical treatment. I believe I have fact-checked and corrected any errors, but I welcome you to point out any I missed: stephenbuttry (at) gmail (dot) com. Or, if you just want to argue about my opinions, that’s fine, too.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

17 responses

21 10 2015
Does pitching really win championships? Yes, but … | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
The Yankees’ 50 best starting pitchers | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Other notable Yankee starting pitchers: Al Downing, Don Gullett, Jim Beattie … | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Nicknames of Yankee starting pitchers: Catfish, Babe, Gator, Whitey … | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee starting pitchers with family connections in baseball | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee starting pitchers with the greatest teammates: Bullet Joe Bush and Mike Torrez | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankees who succeeded as starters and relievers | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankees who pitched no-hitters: Don Larsen, Allie Reynolds … | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankees’ 20-game winners: Mel Stottlemyre, Bob Shawkey, Vic Raschi … | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee starters with 200 wins but no shot at the Hall of Fame | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee pitchers win more championships than Cy Young Awards | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee pitchers who are nearly Hall of Famers: Mussina, Pettitte, Cone, Tiant, Kaat | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee starting pitchers who belong in the Hall of Fame: Reynolds, John and Guidry | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Catfish Hunter and other Yankee pitchers who made the Hall of Fame primarily for other teams | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankees’ 300-game winners: Clemens, Niekro, Perry, Johnson | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankee starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame: Ford, Gomez, Ruffing, Pennock, Hoyt, Chesbro | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

21 10 2015
Yankees among the best almost everywhere but starting pitcher | Hated Yankees

[…] Comparing Yankees to other teams in starting pitchers in the Hall of Fame […]

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: